Sunday, September 23, 2012

A report about reports

A report about reports about reports that recommends the preparation of a report about the report about reports about reports.

From BoingBoing:

http://goo.gl/Ufkju

Monday, September 10, 2012

Libertarian Republican: Looks like Mike Rowe of Discovery's Dirty Jobs will be voting for Mitt Romney come November


MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2012


Looks like Mike Rowe of Discovery's Dirty Jobs will be voting for Mitt Romney come November


"an open letter... If you read the whole thing, I’ll vote for you..."
by Eric Dondero
Let me first disclose, I'm a huge Mike Rowe fan (and of Discovery in general, Deadliest Catch, Outdoor Survival Skills, ect...). This pleases me greatly.
Rowe penned an open letter to Mitt Romney on his site, and to his credit the presidential candidate read it in full. There's even a screen shot of Romney reading the letter on his laptop.
From Twitter, Romney Snr. aide:
Mitt's Body ManVerified‏@dgjackson
RT @Rick_Gorka: Gov catching up on news, incl. an interesting letter about skilled labor from @MikeRoweWorks pic.twitter.com/2wCYMvMm
Rowe's letter (mikeroweworks.com) is lengthy. Here are a few key excerpts:
mikeroweWORKS grew out of a TV show called Dirty Jobs. If by some chance you are not glued to The Discovery Channel every Wednesday at 10pm, allow me to visually introduce myself. That’s me on the right, preparing to do something dirty.
When Dirty Jobs premiered back in 2003, critics called the show “a calamity of exploding toilets and misadventures in animal husbandry.” They weren’t exactly wrong. But mostly, Dirty Jobs was an unscripted celebration of hard work and skilled labor. It still is. Every week, we highlight regular people who do the kind of jobs most people go out of their way to avoid. My role on the show is that of a “perpetual apprentice.” In that capacity I have completed over three hundred different jobs, visited all fifty states, and worked in every major industry.
my theory that most of these [macro-economic] “problems” were in fact symptoms of something more fundamental – a change in the way Americans viewed hard work and skilled labor. That’s the essence of what I’ve heard from the hundreds of men and women I’ve worked with on Dirty Jobs. Pig farmers, electricians, plumbers, bridge painters, jam makers, blacksmiths, brewers, coal miners, carpenters, crab fisherman, oil drillers…they all tell me the same thing over and over, again and again – our country has become emotionally disconnected from an essential part of our workforce. We are no longer impressed with cheap electricity, paved roads, and indoor plumbing. We take our infrastructure for granted, and the people who build it.
Today, we can see the consequences of this disconnect in any number of areas, but none is more obvious than the growing skills gap. Even as unemployment remains sky high, a whole category of vital occupations has fallen out of favor, and companies struggle to find workers with the necessary skills. The causes seem clear. We have embraced a ridiculously narrow view of education. Any kind of training or study that does not come with a four-year degree is now deemed “alternative" [and] many of the jobs this current administration has tried to “create” over the last four years are the same jobs that parents and teachers actively discourage kids from pursuing. (I always thought there something ill-fated about the promise of three million “shovel ready jobs” made to a society that no longer encourages people to pick up a shovel.)
Certainly, we need more jobs, and you were clear about that in Tampa. But the Skills Gap proves that we need something else too. We need people who see opportunity where opportunity exists. We need enthusiasm for careers that have been overlooked and underappreciated by society at large. We need to have a really big national conversation about what we value in the workforce, and if I can be of help to you, I am at your service – assuming of course, you find yourself in a new address early next year.
Only problem for Mike, and unfortunately, what could prove to be a problem for Mitt too, is that too many Americans today, simply do not work at all. We've got 49% of all Americans now sitting on their rears, collecting a Fed Gov paycheck. Even if all the makers vote, the takers may still come out on top.
"A democracy cannot exist as a permanent form of government. It can only exist until the majority discovers it can vote itself largess out of the public treasury. After that, the majority always votes for the candidate promising the most benefits with the result the democracy collapses because of the loose fiscal policy ensuing, always to be followed by a dictatorship, then a monarchy." -- Attributed, Alexis De Tocqueville, 1863

Friday, September 7, 2012